As soon as possible after you experience the teaching encounter you proposed in

As soon as possible after you experience the teaching encounter you proposed in the previous assignment wherein your cultural teacher taught you how to DO something new, take some quality time to write thorough field notes about your experience. What did your brain understand? What did your body understand? What did you see, feel, touch, smell, hear, taste, and intuit? Write as many field notes as you can, but at least write 1,250 words. Do not worry about grammar or intelligibility. Just write! Turn in a 1,500 word paper. A full 1,250 of these words should simply be an excerpt of your raw field notes (or your entire field notes if you only wrote 1,250 words). In the last 250 words, 1) explore your research question, or—if you realized that question really was not important—write what the real question should have been, and try exploring it. Also answer the following questions: 2) What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? And 3) How will this experience help you see something from your own everyday, familiar life in a different way? Don’t know what I mean by field notes? Here is an example from Allaine Cerwonka (not required reading): Improvising Theory 92-93, 100-101, 149-151.pdf download who took field notes in the form of emails to her professor. Her project involved riding along with police officers (cops) in Australia.Here are some field notes (not required reading): Santa Ana Jail field notes.pdf download I took of my visits to the Santa Ana Jail.Here are some more field notes (not required reading): Boy Scouts Field Notes.pdf download of my participation in a Boy Scout troop with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Here are some field notes from a former student download from only a little while ago (April 2020) who proved that embodied fieldwork is possible even when you are not in the same room with your cultural teacher.The rubric below is important. Please check it out so that you know upon which criteria you will be graded. There is one category on the rubric called SENSORIUM. Here is what I mean by that category:What Jason means by “Sensorium:”Cultures around the world have different ways to break up the bodily senses into different groups beyond the basic 5 that many U.S.-raised students learned in kindergarten: taste, smell, touch, vision, and hearing. Of course, many of you are not going to have much in the taste/smell category, but that is okay, you still probably covered 5 or more senses, even if they aren’t so easily distinguishable.For example, if you describe how sparsely a building is decorated, that would be a sort of “spatial” sense different from the “artistic” sense of describing what clothing people are wearing. If you did describe taste, there are many different senses involved in that, such as the “strength” of the taste, the “texture,” the “fullness,” the “saltiness/sweetness,” etc. Also the “temperature” of the room could be a different sense than the “tangibility” of cloth against one’s skin. And I haven’t even mentioned all the metaphysical senses such as the sense of “tension” in the room, or the “spiritual” sense of an otherworldly power. That’s 10 senses right there!I just want you to start thinking with more aspects of your body than simply your eyes and ears. If you only used your eyes and ears, you might as well just watch a film about an experience rather than having your body BE INSIDE the experience. So the more effort your field notes show toward getting data that you could not get from watching a film, the more points that you will get on the sensorium rubric item even if you don’t have exactly 5 discernibly different senses, or all 5 “kindergarten” senses.RubricStrange to Familiar Field Notes RubricStrange to Familiar Field Notes RubricCriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFormat10 pts10At least 1,500 words total including 1,250 words of field notes plus 250 words of interpretation.9 pts9At least 1,500 words total including 1,250 words of field notes plus 250 words of interpretation.8 pts8Less than 1,500 words total, or less than 1,250 words of field notes, or less than 250 words of interpretation.7 pts7Less than 1,500 words total, or less than 1,250 words of field notes, or less than 250 words of interpretation.6 pts6Significantly less than 1,500 words total, or significantly less than 1,250 words of field notes, or significantly less than 250 words of interpretation.5 pts5Significantly less than 1,500 words total, or significantly less than 1,250 words of field notes, or significantly less than 250 words of interpretation.4 pts4see comment3 pts3see comment2 pts2see comment1 pts1see comment0 pts0see comment10 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeField notes10 pts10Field notes lack none of the following: what happened, what went through your mind, insightfulness, evidence of bodily participation in an activity even if you were only digitally present with your cultural teacher.9 pts9Field notes lack none of the following: what happened, what went through your mind, insightfulness, evidence of bodily participation.8 pts8Field notes lack 1 or 2 the following: what happened, what went through your mind, insightfulness, evidence of bodily participation.7 pts7Field notes lack 1 or 2 the following: what happened, what went through your mind, insightfulness, evidence of bodily participation.6 pts6Field notes lack 3 or 4 of the following: what happened, what went through your mind, insightfulness, evidence of bodily participation.5 pts5Field notes lack 3 or 4 of the following: what happened, what went through your mind, insightfulness, evidence of bodily participation.4 pts4see comment3 pts3see comment2 pts2see comment1 pts1see comment0 pts0see comment10 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSensorium10 pts10Field notes draw from data experienced through 5 or more senses.9 pts9Field notes draw from data experienced through 5 or more senses.8 pts8Field notes draw from data experienced through less than 5 senses.7 pts7Field notes draw from data experienced through less than 5 senses.6 pts6Field notes draw from data experienced through mostly 1 sense.5 pts5Field notes draw from data experienced through mostly 1 sense.4 pts4see comments3 pts3see comments2 pts2see comments1 pts1see comments0 pts0see comment10 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeResearch Question10 pts10Provides a thought provoking exploration or revamping of the research question.9 pts9Provides a thought provoking exploration or revamping of the research question.8 pts8Provides an adequate exploration or revamping of the research question.7 pts7Provides an adequate exploration or revamping of the research question.6 pts6Provides an inadequate exploration or revamping of the research question.5 pts5Provides an inadequate exploration or revamping of the research question.4 pts4see comment3 pts3see comment2 pts2see comments1 pts1see comments0 pts0see comment10 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeReflection10 pts10Introspectively answers the following questions: What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? How will this experience help you see something from your everyday, familiar life in a different way?9 pts9Introspectively answers the following questions: What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? How will this experience help you see something from your everyday, familiar life in a different way?8 pts8Adequately answers the following questions: What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? How will this experience help you see something from your everyday, familiar life in a different way?7 pts7Adequately answers the following questions: What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? How will this experience help you see something from your everyday, familiar life in a different way?6 pts6Inadequately answers the following questions: What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? How will this experience help you see something from your everyday, familiar life in a different way?5 pts5Inadequately answers the following questions: What did you learn from this experience about how ethnographic fieldwork can make what was once strange to you seem more understandable? How will this experience help you see something from your everyday, familiar life in a different way?4 pts4see comments3 pts3see comments2 pts2see comments1 pts1see comments0 ptsNo Marks10 ptsTotal Points: 50
Requirements: 1500

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